Changes between Version 11 and Version 12 of CodeBestPractices


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Timestamp:
2012-02-22 13:57:48 (8 years ago)
Author:
jeroens
Comment:

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  • CodeBestPractices

    v11 v12  
    1616 
    1717== Target processor == 
    18 The EwE source code now fully utilizes 64-bit capabilies. In order to make sure that Windows finds the correct 32 or 64 bit Access drivers make sure you always compile your EwE6 main project against x86 or x64, never against AnyCPU in Menu > Build > Configuration Manager. 
     18The EwE source code now fully utilizes 64-bit capabilies. In order to make sure that Windows finds the correct 32 or 64 bit Access drivers make sure you always compile your EwE6 main project against x86 or x64, never against AnyCPU in'' Menu > Build > Configuration Manager''. 
    1919 
    2020Note that 64-bits EwE will not be able to find 32-bit Access database drivers and vice-versa. 
    2121 
    2222== Nasty experiences == 
    23  * Always override Dispose(bDisposing) to clean up UI elements, do not use !OnHandleDestroyed because the .NET framework, which wraps Win32 controls, may call this method during the regular life span of a .NET control to do housekeeping. The call may be followed by !OnHandleCreated - it's simply not a valid trigger to assume your control is dying.  
    24  * Note that the Visual Studio designer automagically places a Dispose method in its *.designer.vb files which is blocked from debugging. You may want to manually move this method to your main vb file and strip off !DebuggerNonUserCode tags that prevent the debugger from stepping through the code. 
     23 * Always override ''Dispose(bDisposing)'' to clean up UI elements, do not use ''!OnHandleDestroyed'' because the .NET framework, which wraps Win32 controls, may call this method during the regular life span of a .NET control to do housekeeping. The call may be followed by ''!OnHandleCreated'' - it's simply not a valid trigger to assume your control is dying.  
     24 * Note that the Visual Studio designer automagically places a Dispose method in its *.designer.vb files which is blocked from debugging. You may want to manually move this method to your main vb file and strip off ''!DebuggerNonUserCode'' tags that prevent the debugger from stepping through the code.